What are High Triglycerides

Triglycerides are a type of fat found in your blood. Your body uses them for energy. You need some triglycerides for good health. But high triglycerides might raise your risk of heart disease and may be a sign of metabolic syndrome.

Metabolic syndrome is the combination of high blood pressure, high blood sugar, too much fat around the waist, low HDL (“good”) cholesterol, and high triglycerides. Metabolic syndrome increases your risk for heart disease, diabetes, and stroke.

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Diana Steele, BSc, RD, Local Registered Dietitians discusses the dangers of high tryglerides.

Quiz: Do You Understand High Triglycerides?

Test your knowledge by answering the following questions:

Questions
True
False
1

Metabolic syndrome is a combination of risk factors.

Explanation:
Metabolic syndrome is a combination of risk factors such as high triglycerides, elevated waist circumference, high blood sugars, high cholesterol and high blood pressure. If you have metabolic syndrome, it’s important to work with your healthcare provider to make aggressive nutritional changes to reduce waist circumference, improve your cholesterol profile or blood pressure and prevent the onset of diabetes.
2

Stress does not affect your triglycerides or heart health.

Explanation:
Studies have shown that high levels of cortisol from long-term stress can increase blood cholesterol and triglycerides. Finding healthy ways to cope with stress can benefit both your physical and mental health.
3

Regular exercise can lower high triglycerides.

Explanation:
Aerobic exercise can increase the amount of HDL (good) cholesterol in your blood, which can help lower triglyceride levels. Aerobic exercise is especially effective at decreasing triglycerides when paired with weight loss.
4

Medications can't cause high triglycerides.

Explanation:
Causes of high triglycerides include obesity, kidney disease, hypothyroidism, poorly-controlled diabetes and certain medications.
5

Saturates mainly come from animal products whereas unsaturated fats are plant-based.

Explanation:
Although it has a negative connotation, fat is essential in our diet - it is one of the three macronutrients that make up the main components of our food. Saturates mainly come from animal products whereas unsaturated fats are plant-based.
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Diana Steele, BSc, RD, Local Registered Dietitians  discusses the role of high triglycerides in diet.

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High Triglycerides

If you have high triglycerides, or you’re trying to lower your LDL cholesterol, you can increase your intake of omega 3 fats.

Omega 3 fats are found in fatty fish. This would be salmon, halibut, tuna, trout, mackerel, sardines, and herring.

You can also increase your intake of nuts and seeds, and in particular, pumpkin seeds and walnuts, as well as flax seeds, and of course adding in more vegetable oils and trying to cook with liquid oils instead of solid fats can increase your omega 3s. Try more olive oil, canola oil, grape seed oil, as well as some nut oils like walnut oil. Local Registered Dieticians  

If you’d like to find out more about how to increase your omega 3 fatty acid intake, contact your local registered dietitian.

Presenter: Ms. Diana Steele, Registered Dietitian, Vancouver, BC

Local Practitioners: Registered Dietitian

High Triglycerides and Diet

If you have high triglycerides, or you’re trying to lower your LDL cholesterol, you can increase your intake of omega 3 fats.

Omega 3 fats are found in fatty fish. This would be salmon, halibut, tuna, trout, mackerel, sardines, and herring. Local Nutritionist 

You can also increase your intake of nuts and seeds, and in particular, pumpkin seeds and walnuts, as well as flax seeds, and of course adding in more vegetable oils and trying to cook with liquid oils instead of solid fats can increase your omega 3s. Try more olive oil, canola oil, grape seed oil, as well as some nut oils like walnut oil. Local Registered Dietitians

If you’d like to find out more about how to increase your omega 3 fatty acid intake, contact your local registered dietitian.Presenter: Ms. Diana Steele, Registered Dietitian, Vancouver, BC

Local Practitioners: Registered Dietitian

Sarah Ware, BSc (Hons), RD, CDE, discusses Benefits of Omega 3 Oils In Your Diet

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